Work Is Love

I am lucky enough to have experienced work that I love. Teaching mindfulness and yoga to children encourages them to build better relationships with themselves, their friends and family, and the world around them. I can’t think of anything more rewarding than that.

But it wasn’t always that way. I’ve worked many a long hour in jobs I disliked just to earn some money and because it’s what ‘everyone else did.’

Maybe you love cooking, music or design? Maybe you’re passionate about the environment or making a difference in the lives of others, but feel you can’t make money following your passions?

We are so conditioned to work ‘for the other man’ in order to get ahead, often working long hours for very little in return. Worse still, we dislike the work we do.

Today, I encourage you to consider a different paradigm.

What would your life look like if you were getting paid to do what you love? What steps can you take to make your vision a reality?

Is it going to take grit, determination and perseverance? Yes. Do you have what it takes? Yes!!! Believe you can.

Work is love made visible.

– Kahlil Gibran

This photos was snapped spontaneously by one of the students from school as the kids played with my hair and goofed around 🤪

I think she’s captured perfectly the joy I receive from working with children and being in their company…

🌼 They remind me not to take life too seriously

🌼 I love the way they are in complete awe and wonder of the magic of life

🌼 Children are full of enthusiasm, even about the smallest of things

🌼 They say what’s on their mind! Zero filter 🙈 ..this can be scary, but it can also be so beautiful and pure that my heart melts every time 😌

And that folks, are just a few of the reasons I friggen love my work ❤️🌈

Do you love what you do? If yes, or if no, why? I’d love to know if your work aligns with your heart’s values…

Love always,

Hayley xx

Little People

courage of little people
Today I watched as the students at school played table tennis against the reining champion, or ‘the King’ as they call him – a cheeky sort of chappy, and popular with his friends. In line with the children stood a bashful girl with Down Syndrome. As she stepped up to the table to take on the champ, I witnessed a beautiful moment of courage and connection. The ‘King’, usually witty and teasing in nature, switched his demeanor to one of pure warmth and compassion. As the girl struggled to aim and hit the ball, he encouraged, complimented and nurtured her. I was humbled by this display of empathy rarely seen among peer groups of today.

‘Courage doesn’t always roar.’

– Mary Radmatcher

Courage can be found in these simple acts of kindness that are often overlooked. Courage is witnessed in those whose endurance is often silent in strength. It is the father who is also ‘mother’ to his two children because ‘Mummy is with the angels now…’ It is the toilet attendant who escaped the bombs, and smiles though her eyes tell of heartache and loss… It is the paramedic who holds a strangers hands and comforts him during his final breaths…It is elderly gentleman working long into his retirement to ensure there is enough food to eat…It is the young girl that wakes before sunrise to care for her sick grandmother before school…

Today, let us not forget the courage and strength found in ordinary people. May we ease the suffering of others wherever possible and acknowledge that we are all in this together. Above all else, let us be kind. Because ‘the world may not acknowledge the courage of little people, but it would fall apart without their courage and endurance.’

In love & light,

Hayley xx

Love What You Do

love-what-you-do

As I sit here with gratitude overflowing, I couldn’t agree more with Katharine Graham’s statement. Today, I taught eighty-one kindergartens how to meditate and do yoga. Their smiling, peaceful faces were a picture of innocence and love. Afterwards, we silly danced to the Beach Boys Surfin USA as we played and laughed and giggled. As the children left, I was gifted with spontaneous hugs and ‘thank you’s’ for teaching them mindfulness. But the truth is, each day they are the ones teaching me. When in the company of children, how can we be anything but in the moment? And this is my daily work. I am so blessed and thankful to love what I do. How can anything else be more fun?

It wasn’t always this way. For a long time I was unfulfilled with my work. I felt it lacked purpose and meaning. But there is a quote by Kahlil Gibran which reminds us that it’s not necessarily what we do, but how we do it.

Work is love made visible.

– Kahlil Gibran

Although it certainly helps, we needn’t love what we do. But we do need to do it with love. When we work from a place of love, whatever our work may be, we breathe life into our work. Which in turn breathes life and meaning into what we do. When we operate from a place of grace and gratitude, we attract more abundance into our lives. Doors begin to open where before, there appeared to be none.

So today, have fun. Whether you are cooking, eating, gardening, cleaning, working, living, loving, laughing! – make each moment matter, and do it with love. Because ‘to love what you do and feel that it matters – how could anything else be more fun?’

In love and light,

Hayley xx

10 Things Every Teaching Assistant Can Relate To

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Since today was national Teaching Assistant day in the UK – I thought I’d share some experiences that most fellow TA’s can probably relate to! And most parents and teachers alike come to think of it!

  1. Children love to hug spontaneously. This is beautiful (apart from when they are covered in paint/glue/snot!)
  2. Children can consume an alarming amount of bogies. It amazes me how they manage to conserve any room in their teeny weeny tummies for actual meals.
  3. Most TA’s will have experienced the painful moment when a child suddenly, and unsuspectingly, vacates their seat at the precise moment you walk passed their chair. Cue rigid, midget furniture plunging deep into soft fatty thigh tissue. Ouch.
  4. Which leads me nicely onto UCIB’s (Unidentified Child Inflicted Bruises). These are usually caused by children bashing you with their chair/ruler/shoe/cricket bat. It isn’t intentional…at least…I don’t think it is?! Children are also in the habit of standing on your foot/leg/chest/head if you happen to be in their way. To put it simply, children will try to walk through you instead of around you if you come between them and their toys.
  5. If you thought you were good at Maths, you haven’t worked in a 21st century Primary School. Children aged six and seven these days are not adding single digits and reciting their three times tables – no!!! They are performing long division, fractions, algebra, adding and subtracting with decimal places – they even know every single times table including their twelve’s!!! And they know them without the need for funny rhymes or mad methods of remembering!!!! They just know (Don’t ask me how – but they do.) That’s why during Maths, it pays to use the phrase ‘Why don’t you share how you arrived at that answer with the rest of the class? Y’know, so that we can celebrate that strangely advanced ninja robot brain of yours (and so that I can quickly grab a calculator to check the answer, of course?!)’
  6. Children are mini mistake correctors. If you say something wrong/spell something incorrect on the board/call somebody by the wrong name – they will immediately and simultaneously proceed to point out your error in a very loud and intimidating way. (Think thirty laughing pointing spell checkers yelling at you from your computer screen – minus the annoying red squiggle.)
  7. You often hear yourself saying the words ‘you should try to go to the toilet during break times and not during lesson times!’ Despite saying this – you let the child go pee. Partly because you don’t want to clean up the mess afterwards, but also because you yourself have ducked out of the classroom at least twice in the last hour to empty your over-caffeinated bladder; and you now feel like a bit of a hypocrite.
  8. People often comment on how wonderful it must be to have all those holidays and to get paid for colouring in and cutting out. Although it’s hard to resist, I would advise strongly against committing any acts of crime against these people (it will show up on your police check and you’re likely to be out of a job as a result.) Besides, it’s not their fault. They either don’t have children; hire a nanny; or are just of the view that all Teaching Assistants do is make paper dolls and sing nursery rhymes. Believe me – there is a reason why we have all those holidays!!!
  9. Which leads me onto my next point. If you didn’t drink alcohol before you became employed in a school – there is aee1a573aee30f88846f8d1a04080079b
    90% chance that you do now. If drinking at 3:30pm on a Friday was once unheard of – it has now become the norm for you and most of your friends (who by the way, also happen to be Teaching Assistants and Teachers.)
  10. Despite working shorter hours then most – you fall out of the doors feeling like you have been inside a washing machine on full spin. Yet with the random madness and unpredictability of the life of a TA; the pulls and the demands of the national curriculum; and the amount of clothes that you have had to throw out due to ‘spillages’ – there comes a responsibility and an emotional reward that far exceeds most other jobs you have experienced – and it is that which makes it all totally worthwhile 🙂

Happy national TA Day!

What would you add to this list?