The Smallest Things…

There’s no doubt that parenting can be lonely business and often the days can seem long and repetitive. But the dichotomy is that I also never want these days to end… Why? Because there is SO much magic in the seemingly mundane, enough to turn even the longest and loneliest of days into my greatest source of joy.

For me, it’s in my morning conversations with Kole; it’s gazing into his eyes and seeing the future in them; it’s studying his ever changing expressions and realising an hour has passed by; it’s feeling his tiny breaths kissing my skin; it’s noticing his crying soften and his tense body relax the moment I hold him close to my heart… If it wasn’t for these moments of magic in our day, parenting would undoubtedly turn us all insane.

But thankfully, ‘sometimes the smallest moments take up the most room in your heart.’ Today, look for the magic. It’s there.

What are the small moments that take up the most room in your heart?

Love always,

Hayley xx

It’s Everywhere

It’s there. Even if it doesn’t always feel that way… The good. It’s everywhere.

Sometimes we’re too in our head, caught in our dramas or those of another, and the beauty is missed.

Today, find the good…

That gentle reassuring touch; a familiar smile; butter melting on warm toast; tea in your favourite mug; fresh sheets; song birds in the morning; silly dancing to your favourite tune; watching the sunset at the end of a long day; taking your next breath and exhaling deeply with a smile…

Don’t let moments like these pass you by, for they may never come to pass again.

Life is good. And today is for living.

Love always,

Hayley xx

Magic

Copy of Those who don't believe in magic will never find it
For some, the magic of Christmas is still very much alive, and for others, Christmas can be a tough time of the year.

At times, I struggle living on the other side of the world away from family and friends. I also reminisce of loved ones lost, memories of times when our family was complete… Maybe you feel the same?

In the absence of those we hold dear, we must work a little harder to embrace the joys of Christmas. Over the years, there are a few things that have helped me to remain open to the magic of Christmas, and I’d like to share them with you:

  1. Take the focus off yourself. The act of giving naturally places you into a position of receiving. When you give your time, love, patience and gifts to others, this simple act of service ignites a sense of peace and fulfilment within. Make somebody smile this Christmas with your words or actions and feel the warmth it brings to your heart.
  2. Spend time with children. If you wish to feel more of the magic of Christmas, be in the company of children. Whether they are your nieces, nephews, or your own offspring, spending time with children at Christmas is the surest way to connect with your own inner child. If you don’t have young ones in your family, consider taking gifts to a children’s hospital. Share the joy of Christmas with those who need it most.
  3. Slow Down. It’s so easy to get caught up in the mayhem of Christmas that it’s no wonder the magic can often feel lost. We over spend, over eat and over ‘do’ to the point we become stressed, burnt out and blue. This Christmas, slow down. Take your time and be present. Simplify simplify simplify. Remember what the true magic of Christmas is about – connection. Take time to connect with strangers and loved ones, but most important, take time to connect with yourself. Take a stroll, a warm bubble bath or play your favourite Christmas jingles as you prepare a meal. Give yourself the gift of self-love.

I hope you received some little gems of magic in these simple, yet powerful tips. Embracing you all in a warm, loving hug. May your time be filled with magical, loving connections this Christmas and beyond.

In love & light,

Hayley xx

 

Magic in the Air

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December is a magical month. A month of miracles. (It’s also a month of high stress, frantic preparations and empty pockets!) But above all else, there is a sense of love, connection and magic in the air as we go about our daily rounds. We begin to reflect on the year gone by, and set in motion our hopes and dreams for the year to come. With all the magical mayhem of Christmas, let us not forget to dream. For dreaming is where the magic happens.

Everything starts as a dream. And your dreams are real.

So go after them!

In Love & Light,

Hayley xx

The Magic in The Mundane

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I often wonder at the contrast of life. It is oftentimes noted that without contrast, we could not know life’s opposites. Without knowing what we do not want, how could we ever know what we do want?

It got me wondering about finding the magic in the mundane. Being mindful and present even when life is lacking in obvious spark.

It is easy for us to feel inspired when looking out over the vast ocean, or delighting in a fresh slice of water melon. But is it only when basking in the flood of a magnificent sunset, or when nature cajoles us to walk beside Her and revel in Her harmonious ways, that such peace and bliss may become accessible? What when we are in the midst of a disagreement with our spouse? Or when we have shattered something sentimental and dear? When our dreams have become broken or worse still, simply faded away?

In times such as these, we don’t often notice the magic. We dismiss life’s teachings and the growth opportunities being offered.

If we are unable or unwilling to take a step back and view the bigger picture, we risk becoming misaligned, disconnected from our truth. Could a disagreement with a loved one be an assertion of our boundaries, giving voice to something that has long remained unspoken? Maybe it is our own behaviour that requires attention, and so is being brought to light for the greater good of the relationship? Did we break or lose something tangible because we have been refusing to let go of the past? Forgetting that love is not short-lived, but enduring and eternal? Maybe our unfulfilled dreams are a reminder that life is too short to squander our time feeling despondent and powerless?

Whatever the reason, these moments are here, not to cause our lives to become stagnant, blocked and miserable, but to allow us to recognise beauty when we see it, to feel elation and joy when they come to visit, to know the blessings that transcend pain, and to be grateful that we can know all of this – because had we not experienced their opposite, we could never come to know the fullness of finding such magic in the mundane.

In love and light,

Hayley xx

Losing My (Self)

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There was once a time when I thought God was just a made up story, like Father Christmas, or the Tooth Fairy, or the Easter Bunny. Of course, there was also a time in my early childhood when I believed in all of the magic of the world; but by the age of eleven, when asked by my peers if I believed in God, I would respond with a firm: ‘No.’ A genuine disbelief? I’m not quite sure … A fear of being ridiculed? Most likely.

It wasn’t uncommon to be picked on for being different in our school. Those who grew up in the tough neighborhoods bullied the ‘posh kids’; the ‘posh kids’ looked down their noses at the ‘rough kids’. And if you came from the council estates like I did, but was raised with manners and respect – you were constantly pulled in both directions, your allegiance questioned at every opportunity. Social boxes became apparent from a very early age, and, although I was aware of the divide, I wasn’t quite sure where I fitted in.

Bullying would take place for all manner of reasons, verbal and physical; if you admitted to still believing in Santa, you were a ‘baby’; if you admitted to believing in God, you were a ‘bible basher’; if you didn’t have nice trainers, you were a ‘scruff’ or a ‘dosser’; if you did have nice trainers, someone would stomp on them with muddy feet and yell ‘Christened!’ (Kind of ironic really.)

As a result, much of my time at school was spent trying to keep a low profile and aligning myself with other kids smart enough to do the same. In doing so, however, it wasn’t long before I lost my sense of identity along with my ebbing belief in magic and miracles. By the time I reached the end of my primary years, the magic carpet had been swiftly pulled out from under my feet and I came crashing down upon the concrete floor of ‘reality’. There began my new life in secondary school, where things only went from bad to worse.

I was smoking by the end of my first year, drinking alcohol by the time I was fourteen and dabbling in recreational drugs by the age of fifteen. With the brief magic of childhood behind me, I took comfort in the false security of my peers. I was totally lost. And despite a continuing nagging that I was straying from all that I loved; books, Roald Dahl, drawing, Disney – I continued to follow the crowd throughout most of my teens.

If I did try to stay home – it wouldn’t be long before they would come knocking at my door, rarely taking ‘no’ for an answer. As an introvert, I had always struggled to say ‘no’ in case I offended someone – and my friends knew I was a push over, so off I’d go against my better judgement, dawning my hoody and trainers and joining them out on the cold, wet streets of Tameside, Manchester.

Mum would constantly tell me I was being led astray and that she didn’t like the person I was becoming. Whilst Mum was frank in her disapproval, she was not so forthcoming with solutions. I would resort to asking Mum to pretend I wasn’t home, but she soon tired of lying and eventually ran out of ideas of where she could pretend I was, especially since they came knocking daily. This would cause Mum and I to argue, her words felt like an attack and our relationship became more and more strained until eventually, those friends became my family and I was sleeping at their house more than my own.

Their parents were usually at the pub until late most nights. Feeling like rejects, we took solace in each others company. Despite the early exposure to the smoking and the drinking and the mayhem; we would make time to laugh, and sing and dance like the children we longed to still be – there was nothing that Spice Girls and Five couldn’t fix. Whilst we had no idea how to live, our bond had grown stronger and bound us together during those lonely days. As different as we appeared to be on the outside, at the core we wanted the same – love, belonging, understanding and connection.

***

By the time I was sixteen, my relationship with Mum was fairly beaten – I went to live with my Gran and stayed there for a year before moving to Spain with a friend and his family. All the while I felt separated from the world and my family – disconnected, lost. It never occurred to me that within, was a deep well of unconditional love that was just waiting to be accessed. Never once did I turn to God, to Source, for healing and guidance. I had forgotten myself – my true Self. There I was, wandering through life making unconscious decisions, partying too hard, living recklessly and failing to notice that whispering voice within. Is it any wonder, then, that God sent me a huge wake up call?

Are you able to pin point the moment when you began to feel separated? Disconnected? Have you managed to find connection again? Moreover, what do you do to sustain that feeling of Oneness?

To be continued…  (I promise – there is a light…)